Bahrain Protest: We met them with peace, they met us with bullets

The nurses held up a sign “We met them in peace, they met us in bullets”. Bahrain’s army deliberately killed peaceful protesters with live rounds. I saw this video and it just was horrifying:

Justamira tweets “I am tired, shattered and broken. I saw ppls brain’s splattered and men in uniform shooting boys: Why? #Bahrain #Feb14”

One of the victims wrote in facebook wall, his last status update just before his death:

I am ready to sacrifice my soul to my country – last status update of Ali Al Mo’min

It is really chaos out there now in Bahrain.

To give you an idea about the latest developments, here are some updates from Guardian Blog :

• Libyan security forces killed 35 people in the eastern city of Benghazi last night, according to Human Rights Watch. This brings the death toll from three days of protests in the east of Libya to 84, according to the New York-based group. Eyewitness accounts given to news agencies suggest the total could be significantly higher.

• Libya’s main internet service provider, General Post and Telecommunications Company, has largely cut off access to the internet. Al-Jazeera says its Arabic news channel is being jammed on several frequencies.

• Bahrain’s main Shia opposition group has rejected King Hamad’s offer of national dialogue to end the violent unrest in the Sunni-ruled Gulf state. At least 50 people were wounded on Friday in the capital, Manama, following the funerals for four protesters killed on Thursday.

Protesters reaffirm peace by offering flowers. Some are now carrying flowers for hundreds of riot police who prepare to attack. The chants echo for the fall of the regime and raising signs of “no dialogue untill it falls”

See the photos of protesters in Bahrain.

Share:

About BlogWatch

BlogWatch began in November 2009 as a group of independent-minded bloggers and social media users helping with voter education. It has since evolved into a group of citizen advocates who engage government and the private sector, online and offline, for social good.

BlogWatch does not solicit, ask for, demand or receive any financial or material remuneration for involvement in its activities, whether in cash or in kind. Read our editorial policy which includes disclosure, methodology and corrections policy.

Share your thoughts on BlogWatch

 

Got something to say? Share your perspectives on current issues and contribute to the conversation.  Just contact the editorial board.

Read our older posts

“Best Story:” Award for Data Journalism PH 2015

BlogWatch received the “Best Story” Award for the First Data Journalism PH 2015 from the Open Knowledge Foundation and Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism “Aid Monitoring: Citizens’ Initial Efforts in the Wake of Typhoon Yolanda” . Forbes Philippines also garnered the same award.

BlogWatch receives the “Best Story” Award for the First Data Journalism PH 2015 from the Open Knowledge Foundation and Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism  for their story on “Aid Monitoring: Citizens’ Initial Efforts in the Wake of Typhoon Yolanda” . Forbes Philippines also received the same award.

Send Us A Message