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Formal opposition to Sec. Leila de Lima and Cong. Neil Tupas, Jr Filed

Statement from Atty. Rico Quicho on the filing of: (1) a formal opposition against the nomination of Justice Sec. Leila de Lima for Chief Justice; and (2) an appeal for the voluntary inhibition of Cong. Neil Tupas, Jr. in the deliberations of the JBC

We cannot cherry-pick our morality. The same lofty legal and moral standards that were applied in unseating a Chief Justice should likewise be bases in naming a new one. That, or irreversibly erode the faith and confidence of our countrymen–the bedrock of credibility and respectability upon which stands any and all democratic institutions–in the Judiciary.

Today, as a private citizen and an officer of the court, I have done as promised. I filed my opposition against the nomination of Justice Secretary Leila de Lima for Chief Justice and appealed for the voluntary inhibition of Rep. Neil Tupas Jr. in the deliberations of the Judicial and Bar Council.

I took the first formal step in doing away with the BS, the “Bantay-Salakay,” that have, seemingly by design, found their away in the selection process for the next Chief Justice.

The letter to the JBC speaks for itself. It is attached herewith for your appreciation. How it closes, however, is worth noting:

“Surely, there is not a dearth of good men and women from whose ranks the next Chief Justice of the land may be selected; and not a scarcity of competent and impartial men and women to participate in the selection. There are several names in the list of nominees. The presence of Senator Francis Joseph Escudero in the Council already sufficiently satisfies the requirement for a representative from Congress therein. Striking Sec. de Lima off the list of nominees and having Cong. Tupas voluntarily inhibit from the selection will not hurt the process. On the contrary, it will infuse credibility and respectability where these may, for one reason or another, already be lacking.”

Photo source: Inquirer.net

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