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Egypt under protest

In an action unprecedented in Internet history, the Egyptian government appears to have ordered service providers to shut down all international connections to the Internet.

According to this tweet, @AnonymousIRC: Internet is down in #Egypt 10 minutes after AP posted this video of a man being shot – http://apne.ws/hgEg4d

And they said there is no such thing as a social media revolution. It just shows that it is a threat to the government. The government is of no use to the people if they shut down the internet. Let me just quote what a Twitter user said.

RT @aveltens: If your government shuts down the internet, shut down your government

This is just mind boggling and unprecedented. Some quotable quotes:

RT @seanpaulkelley: What would US policymakers say if Ahmedinejad & Iran shut down the internet? Got hypocrisy? #jan25 #egypt

#MLK quoting #JFK in “Beyond Vietnam:” Those who make peaceful revolution impossible, make violent revolution inevitable #Jan25 #Egypt

In the “The revolution will not be tweeted”, Parvez Sharma talks about social media revolution:

Don’t assume that this is a twitter and Facebook “revolution”—they have been useful yes, but the majority of Egyptians DO NOT have the internet or smartphones. However the “leaders” of the movement have used twitter to communicate details to each other about which streets are blocked, where there is tear gas, their own coordinates and then also to the outside world with the common hash tags of #Jan25 and #Egypt.A lot of the tweeting has also been in Arabic but now “please know that no one is tweeting anymore, Parvez-Khalaas.”

The thing is we, outside Egypt can still watch and amplify their voices.

Follow updates on Egypt here

Here are what others in social media think (to be updated):

Photo credit: twitter

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