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Observation update:The slow aggregation of electronic results

As of 10am, two days after election day, only 69.1618% of the PCOS machines have transmitted results to the Comelec transparency server.

The slow aggregation of electronic results confirms reports being sent by our volunteers nationwide to the NAMFREL National Operations Center in Mandaluyong City on the problems experienced in the transmission of results from the PCOS machines due to several reasons such as lack of modem, weak or lack of signal, and the PCOS malfunctioning.

In NCR, there were a number of precincts in Makati City that had machines shutting down during operation, delaying transmission. In Southern Luzon, a number of precincts in Laguna had to request for new PCOS machines due to the inoperability of existing machines. In the town of Cabuyao, some of the PCOS machines did not have a seal, causing chaos and confusion in the municipal office. At the Lakeview Elementary School in Muntinlupa, lack of modems is blamed for the cause of delay in transmission. In parts of northern Luzon – Abra, Baguio City, Tarlac and Bulacan were besieged with signal weakness. The same issue did not spare precincts in Metro Manila. Volunteers in Makati and San Juan reported problems in the transmission of results to the national servers. In Manila’s Guerrero Elementary School, volunteers tried to pull the PCOS machine out of the precinct to get a better signal, but to no avail. In Surigao Del Norte, numerous precincts have given up on their machines and decided to bring their CF cards to the Municipal Board of Canvassers (MBOC) in San Isidro.

The NAMFREL National Operations Center will continue to actively receive, consolidate, and release Incident Reports from concerned citizens. NAMFREL will release its preliminary report soon on the conduct of the Random Manual Audit that NAMFREL volunteers observed.For more information, news and results from NAMFREL, please visit www.elections.org.ph.

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