Crowdsourcing Act allows people to participate online

Senator Teofisto “TG” Guingona III has filed Senate Bill No. 3300, otherwise known as “The Crowdsourcing Act of 2012.” The bill allows people to comment on pending bills through email and the internet. It also allows the public to access copies of bills and measures pending before the Senate and the House of Representatives.

Furthermore, the bill extends the people’s right of participation to include the ability to reach their congresspersons and senators even during the period of interpellation and debates. Guingona believes that the people’s views at this point in the lawmaking process will serve as vital guidance for the senators and congresspersons to make their final vote on pending measures.

Continuing his advocacy to promote and strengthen people participation in the formulation of vital national policies, Guingona explains the principles of the proposed bill: “Crowdsourcing recognizes and allows the individual and collective power of the people, with the use of the internet and/or other information and communications system, to contribute to the formulation, improvement, and creation of laws that benefit the entire nation.”

Sen. Guingona emphasized that lawmaking is a shared privilege and duty of legislators and citizens. Because of this, he believes that Congress has the duty to hear the opinion of people beyond the walls of the Senate or the House of Representatives.

“From Batanes to Sulu, people must be allowed to participate in the process of law-making. When people are allowed to participate, we have better laws. When people are allowed to participate, we have better people,” Sen. Guingona asserts.

Sen. Guingona has also uploaded the measure online to invite the people to help improve the bill. People can send their comments to [email protected] with SUBJECT: Crowd Sourcing Act of 2012.

Image via Senator Guingona facebook

Share:

About BlogWatch

BlogWatch began in November 2009 as a group of independent-minded bloggers and social media users helping with voter education. It has since evolved into a group of citizen advocates who engage government and the private sector, online and offline, for social good.

BlogWatch does not solicit, ask for, demand or receive any financial or material remuneration for involvement in its activities, whether in cash or in kind. Read our editorial policy which includes disclosure, methodology and corrections policy.

Share your thoughts on BlogWatch

 

Got something to say? Share your perspectives on current issues and contribute to the conversation.  Just contact the editorial board.

Read our older posts

“Best Story:” Award for Data Journalism PH 2015

BlogWatch received the “Best Story” Award for the First Data Journalism PH 2015 from the Open Knowledge Foundation and Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism “Aid Monitoring: Citizens’ Initial Efforts in the Wake of Typhoon Yolanda” . Forbes Philippines also garnered the same award.

BlogWatch receives the “Best Story” Award for the First Data Journalism PH 2015 from the Open Knowledge Foundation and Philippine Center for Investigative Journalism  for their story on “Aid Monitoring: Citizens’ Initial Efforts in the Wake of Typhoon Yolanda” . Forbes Philippines also received the same award.

Send Us A Message