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Survey: 8 out of 10 Filipinos will respect impeachment verdict

Regardless of what the decision will be, 86% of Filipinos will respect the Senate’s verdict on the impeachment of Chief Justice Renato Corona, a survey revealed.

Laylo Research Strategies (LRS) conducted a survey from January 28 to February 6, 2012 and asked 1,500 Filipinos, chosen through a “multi-stage probability method across 77 provinces and 46 highly urbanized cities” questions relating to the impeachment proceedings.

The survey revealed that 8% will join rallies if Corona is absolved while 4% will protest if he is impeached. Around 2% remain undecided.

At the same time, 57% said they are personally undecided on how to judge the impeachment trial because they don’t know much about the case. ABS-CBN News Online noted that Corona was already impeached when the House of Representatives filed the case. It is the Senate that will determine if he is guilty or not. Nevertheless, 17% of those asked said they definitely want Corona impeached while another 17% said “he should probably be impeached.” A small minority of 5% said he should “probably” be absolved while 2% said they want him absolved.

Who is watching?

The survey also revealed that 1 out of 4 or 24% of Filipinos closely monitor the trial. Around 33% “sometimes follow the news” while 43% rarely bother. However, only 7% said that they watch the live telecast of the impeachment trial.

Television is the main source of news for those following the trial, with 89% saying that they tune in for updates on the trial. It is followed by radio news at 22% and informal people’s discussions at 9%.

Credibility of articles

Out of the eight (8) articles of impeachment, the public said the only credible accusation is that of Corona siding with former President Gloria Arroyo in cases involving her and her administration.

Around half said they are undecided on the performance of the prosecution panel (48%) and even the defense panel (59%).

Fairness

Meanwhile, 34% said they think the Senator-Judges are objective but a close to half (47%) are undecided. Around 17% said the judges are biased. When asked which Senators seem pro- or anti-Corona, LRS said “pluralities to majorities could not identify specific names.”

LRS said, “The survey results show an admission on the part of the Filipino public of a lack of competence to render judgment on a complicated issue such as the impeachment  of the Chief Justice. They are relying on the Senate to make the decision and will respect whatever decision they make.”

The group added, “The president continues to enjoy widespread popular support, but across groups—from his most ardent supporters and his allies, to those neutral about him, to his critics—there is a common tendency to withhold judgment on whether the Chief Justice should be removed from office and overwhelming respect for whatever will be the final decision of the Senate as an impeachment court.”

Summary Results on Opinions on the Impeachment Trial Lrs Ph0220123

This poll was conducted among a sample of 1,500 Filipino adults nationwide, interviewed in-person from January 28 to February 6, 2012. Multi-stage probability sampling was applied, allocated into 300 respondents each in the National Capital Region, North & Central Luzon, South Luzon & Bicol, Visayas and Mindanao. The survey consisted of 300 unique sampling points spread across 15 cities and 2 Municipalities in NCR, 36 provinces and 7 Highly Urbanized Cities/independent cities in Luzon, 16 provinces and 7 Highly Urbanized Cities/independent cities in the Visayas, and 25 provinces and 8 Highly Urbanized Cities/independent cities in Mindanao. The error due to sampling for results based on the nationwide sample has an expected error margin of ±2.6%. The error for subgroups is higher. Area estimates were weighted by projected number of adults to obtain the estimates for Total Philippines.

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Survey: 8 out of 10 Filipinos will respect impeachment verdict

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