Twitter reactions on Col. Moammar Gadhafi /Gaddafi death

The news of Col. Gadhafi’s death sparked widespread celebration in Tripoli. News readers on Libyan State Television repeated the earlier claim of his capture and announced the full liberation of the country.


Moammar Gadhafi’s last moments. Badly injured but still alive. Full raw video including the last frames cut by Al-Jazeera and Al-Arabyia

There was initial confusion on the veracity of the reports of his death. Some tweets found his death quite suspicious.

The photos and videos taken by a cellphone camera were quite disturbing. Someone said it was inhumane to show it on TV.

While others celebrated, a tweet said , “I’ll never celebrate someone’s death, U.S & Europe have done so so many deals with Gaddafi.” Another tweet cited that it was “Disturbing to hear GOP leaders like John McCain celebrate Gaddafi’s death, considering they have funded killing of Arabs & Muslims”. This tweet says it best “I won’t take delight in #Gadhafi’s death but I will in our Libyan brothers’ and sisters’ freedom. Congratulations.”

Then there is a matter of the spelling of his name. I noticed it myself. Wall Street Journal spelled it “Gadhafi” and BBC News as “Gaddafi”. The confusion remains ” I’ve used 3 styles to spell this dead Lybia dude, wats d correct spelling sef” as shown in one tweet. Twitter is trending because of the clamor for the correct spelling. “Khaddafi/Gaddafi? I don’t want to disrespect my Muslim brothers by using wrong spelling. Someone verify the correct way plz”. Another tweet asked to see the death certificate just to settle the spelling.

After 42 years of Gaddafi’s terrorist rule, what’s next for Libya? What does Gadhafi’s death mean for the future of the country?

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