Sign conformity to Barangay Ayala Alabang Ordinance No. 1 before entering church?

Update March 21: @vivazapanta deleted the tweet about the “signing support for ordinance”. Her friend was afraid to speak up. You can still see the tweet thread at the end of the curated tweets.

@vivazapanta tweeted ” From my friend: Today, mass-goers at Alabang Country Club were not allowed to attend mass unless they signed support for ordinance.”

She added “Exact words of my friend re mass at Ayala Alabang Country Club”

We had to sign conformity to 1-2011 before we could enter.

It is recalled that the Barangay Ayala Alabang Ordinance No. 1 titled, “An Ordinance providing for the Safety and Protection of the Unborn Child,” restricts the sale and use of all forms of contraceptives within the barangay. The ordinance passed by Brgy. Captain Alfred A. Xerez-Burgos, Jr. and his council in early January caught the ire of reproductive health supporters as they see it as part of an orchestrated act of the Catholic hierarchy to impose their religious dogma.

Apparently, it is not just a matter of choice. Conformity is needed before entering this church.

Meanwhile sermons in churches continue to contain the mention of the RH Bill. @jimaraneta cited “Mr. Priest, I know it in relation to the rh bill but please dont talk about oral&anal sex during the homily. & w/ kids around?” Apparently the “the priest was tying it up to pamphlets given out in schools about positions that pose no risk to conception”, He added that ” it would have been more uncomfortable if my 8 year old was there. Still un-comfy even if it was my 17 year old w/ me”

You can view the podcast from Filipino Free Thinkers where they recap what happened at the public hearing on the Ayala Alabang Village Ordinance that, among other things, required prescriptions for contraceptives — even condoms.

Meanwhile, in Twitter:

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